* Kefir Bananarama Shake à la Fabulous Fermentation Week *

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I’m so into bananarama shakes right now. I simply must have at least one per day, usually straight after work or on weekend afternoons before heading to the Botanics for some frisbee extravaganza action. I usually make my bananaramas with almond milk, but my dear friend and fellow food blogger Kauia Moriaty who writes the wunderbar eat it blog, informed me of the ladies who are spreading the joys of fermenting to the masses. Elenore Bendel Zahn who writes the Earthsprout blog and Sarah Britton from My New Roots are pioneering this fermentastic revolution and provide thorough and informed expositions on the benefits of fermenting fabulously.

I’m fairly new to fermenting, in fact, I’d only ever fermented kefir using cow’s milk and the result was seriously tart – so tart, it was undrinkable. The Fabulous Fermentation Week inspired me to try again and reap the nutritional rewards of these (dare I say) seriously strange grains.

Kefir is fermented milk made with kefir grains, which is a symbiotic culture of yeasts and good bacteria. It’s believed to have originated in the Caucasus mountains and is increasing in popularity as people are waking up to its incredible health benefits. Kefir is highly nutritious, full of gut-aiding probiotics and has a good dose of B12, which is good news for vegans and vegetarians whose diets are usually lacking in this integral vitamin. It also contains vitamins B1, B6, D, as well as folic acid, iodine, calcium and iron. Kefir can also be made from various types of milk, including coconut, almond, rice, seed, soy or dairy and can also ferment fruit juice and coconut water.

I purchased whole milk kefir from the organic store and sat it on the bench for a couple of days until the cauliflower-esque grains appeared and the kefir had started to form. As I wanted to make an almond milk kefir, I strained the kefir and washed the wee grains thoroughly and started the kefir process again, by putting the kefir grains and a good dose of almond milk in a jar, popping the lid on and allowing it to sit for a day or two.

If you find it really hard to stomach uber-tart food or beverages, disguising kefir is the key. Bananas are a great way to disguise the tartiest of tart flavours and coconut milk provides a creamy hit to balance the shake. LSA (Linseed, Sunflower, Almond mix) fortified with buckwheat, quinoa and chia provide an extra nutrient hit and the honey (or agave, maple syrup) gives the bananarama shake a nectarous finish.

Kefir Bananarama Shake à la Fabulous Fermentation Week                                                                                                                                                                

A cup of kefir, any which way you please

A cup of coconut milk

2 very ripe bananas

2 tablespoons of LSA

A tablespoon of raw honey, agave or maple syrup

A few cubes of ice

Put all of the ingredients into a blender and whizzz. Serve on the deck in the sun with your dearest or if you’re in the cooler climes, watching the snow and dreaming of summery pastures new.

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9 responses »

  1. Pingback: Earthsprout – Go Green Hot´n Healthy Superfood Sauerkraut [ Fabulous Fermentation Week ] » Earthsprout - Go Green Hot´n Healthy

  2. Yum, this is such a great way to put homemade kefir to good use! Full of nutrition. I’m intrigued by the LSA mixture you mentioned – do you purchase it or make it yourself?

  3. Lovely! Last week I also made up a batch of kefir after reading the Fabulous Fermentation week posts! Just wonderful! I love your idea of disguising its sometimes …. tang.. with bananas, I agree they sure do cut the flavor!

  4. Hi Emily! This was a great post. I’m very interested in how you obtained the kefir grains from the store-bought kefir, and I’d like to try this too. Is there anything specific I should look for in choosing a kefir to to obtain my grains? Thanks so much! Yay, Fermentation Week!!!

    • Hi Kate! Thanks for your kind words. I bought the kefir grains from the organic shop here in Dunedin, New Zealand, which was already fermenting in milk. I’ve recently seen sachets of kefir in the health food store, but I’ve not personally tried it. I think what’s important is to research what is available and ensure it is from a store of good repute. Good luck! Emily :)

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